What’s in a Name? The Story of “Corvus”

We’re often asked about the significance of our name, Corvus Insurance. It’s a story we enjoy telling, because it helps explain our approach to building products and writing Smart Commercial Insurance™ policies.

Corvus is a class of birds – a genus, specifically – that includes species like crows, ravens, and rooks. As a group, these birds are known for their exceptional intelligence. Crows are said to be as smart as seven- to ten-year-old humans. They are great communicators and collaborators and have long, detailed memories.

Perhaps their most remarkable quality is their ability to create tools. Crows not only use twigs to extract insects from logs — they take it a step further by carving hooks at the end of the twigs to make them more effective. They’ve also been observed dropping crabs in busy roadways so that their prey is run over by cars, making for an easier snack. This kind of resourcefulness makes corvids fascinating creatures to study.

It’s these traits of corvids that inspire us at Corvus Insurance.

We, too, create tools, like our web-based platform CrowBar. We use all the materials available to us — in this case, not twigs, but rich streams of data — to uncover actionable information to share with brokers and their clients. By bringing a greater degree of intelligence to the entire commercial insurance process, we strive to deliver on the promise of our product name, Smart Commercial Insurance™.

That’s what makes us Corvids: resourcefully building tools to help empower insurance brokers with data and smart policies. We’re building our “nest” and growing our flock, and we are ready to soar with you.

Three Ways to Use Data to Win New Business in 2019

2019 is upon us and many brokers are already into their new production year. Organic growth from new accounts or new lines of property and casualty business are two major means of meeting and exceeding these goals— but organic growth is difficult, and so is grabbing the attention of insurance buyers. InsurTech advances are allowing for some exciting new developments in differentiated product development that can help open doors for new clients and help round out accounts with new kinds of coverages, such as cyber insurance. In particular, the use of previously ignored or inaccessible data can move the needle and get the attention of insurance buyers in 2019. But how can you do that with everything else on your desk? We’d like to pitch some ideas.

First, align yourself with partners that can put data to work for you. Corvus is one of many data suppliers to the industry. Others, using a SaaS (Software as a Service) model sell “seats” or “licenses” to brokers. Prominent among them are AIR Worldwide and RMS, which use data to predict the likelihood of catastrophes such as earthquakes and windstorms. Their data is also used to help brokers and insureds determine the maximum probable losses in certain situations. In the same way, Corvus provides reports from externally sourced data that can help you and your clients predict and prevent claims.

Second, determine which coverage areas have the most potential for you and your clients to leverage novel data sets. These will generally be in areas that are causing anxiety for customers, such as property catastrophe risk, cyber insurance, and areas with large severity exposure. Predicting and preventing large and uncertain claims is far more urgent for insurance buyers than managing smaller events like slip and fall liability claims– or even more predictable events, such as auto claims.

Finally, demonstrate your expertise by using social media. LinkedIn and Twitter are business favorites, but in some communities, Facebook can be a strong tool in getting out the news about new risks and solutions. Effective social media is frequent, with headlines that grab attention (but aren’t sensational), and timely (linked to recent news developments). It can be enhanced with strong graphics and links to larger reports and external sources. Corvus and other marketing-oriented underwriting partners provide this information to its brokers. You should not need to find this information yourself.

While Corvus is not the only company to master unique data sets in order to support insurance brokers and their clients, we are digital natives. Everything at Corvus is built with digital integration in mind. From data science to data analytics to social media and other marketing tools, it all results in victory.

For more information about how Corvus can empower your 2019 New Business plans, contact Gerritt Graham, Chief Commercial Officer at ggraham@corvusinsurance.com. Here’s to a happy and successful 2019!

Does OpenTable Equal Opening to Risk?

The risk of cyber-attacks and security breaches are becoming a critical concern for restaurant executives. Restaurants are experiencing a wave of technology innovation in everything from the customer experience to operational efficiency. With these technology enhancements comes an ever-increasing number of third-party vendors that interact with a restaurant’s customers and the business as a whole. New business relationships and processes can create security gaps, alter access to sensitive data, or cause increases in cyber risk liability exposures and threats.

The days of calling a restaurant for a reservation are all but over. Customers have come to expect real-time visibility into table availability online. Restaurants are becoming more and more dependent on apps to remain front and center with their customers, to increase traffic, and to better manage table turns. Loyalty programs are also being integrated to capture sensitive customer data, as well as to provide services like food delivery or tableside kiosks. These third-party technologies may or may not be integrated with the restaurant’s point-of-sale system but regardless, restaurant management will likely not have knowledge of how this data is stored, segregated, or transmitted. These third parties may also be sharing or sorting sensitive data with other parties unbeknownst to the restaurant, which creates vulnerabilities and entry points for cyber attacks and requires greater vigilance to protect customer data.

Payment processing is continuously evolving and increasingly shifting liability to the merchant if they cannot keep up with expensive and ever-changing technology standards. Therefore, strengthening resilience to cyber breaches is essential to business continuity.

The path forward for restaurant owners demands expanding cybersecurity programs in whole. This includes a core of controls and processes around the most sensitive assets, including up-to-date data on areas of vulnerabilities such as vendor software patching. Not acting on known areas of weakness in their environment is the most common factor for those that have been attacked. Awareness of how threats are evolving is critical to having the ability to analyze situations and to properly plan for business continuity.

What is also sometimes lost is that the biggest weakness with data security in the restaurant industry is the human component. It is an industry that is heavily reliant on lower cost labor, often experiences high turnover, and engages with a variety of third parties, including outsourcers; and directly interacts with customers through various physical and digital venues. This complex extended enterprise makes cultural awareness of data security important not only at the corporate level but also at the store level.

As the threats evolve, however, so does the spectrum of risk mitigation solutions that can be put in place to combat possible attack. Innovative insurance products, like the Smart Cyber policies offered through Corvus Insurance, use data scans to help restauranteurs identify possible vulnerabilities on an ongoing basis and provide liability coverage to address some of these new risks. Digital exposures emanating from third-party service providers should be adequately addressed in a cyber liability insurance policy. This may include comprehensive coverage extensions for contingent business interruption, PCI-DSS fines and penalties, and breach response expenses tied to contractual indemnification provisions. Sunshine is the best prevention as Corvus identifies risks for restaurants to manage.

Are you up to speed on “silent cyber” risk? Check out our new whitepaper: Silent Cyber: Threat or Opportunity?

Innovation in Life Sciences brings Great Possibility, but also New Risks

The powerful current of new digital technology has caused disruptive and transformational changes in the Life Science industry. This is changing the future of cancer treatment, producing life-changing vaccines, and allowing for valuable research efforts that many of us couldn’t even imagine. Much of the innovation is being powered by data and in many cases more and more personalized data. Information has never been more valuable and life sciences are becoming one of the most vulnerable industries to data breaches.

What’s at risk?

The cyber risks that plague life sciences can be detrimental. Compromised biotech research goes beyond issues for shareholders— there could be information powerful enough to develop dangerous products and bioweapons. As criminals and other threat actors continue to uncover new ways of monetizing sensitive and confidential data, these data assets are in turn becoming more and more valuable. Cybersecurity threats in the life sciences industry can directly put people’s health, safety, and security at risk. Many pharma and biotech companies, especially high-profile consumer brands, are high-value targets for cyber attackers.

Among the major threats in pharma and biotech are these three top points of concern:

  • Clinical Trial Data: this includes sensitive patient data that is generated from clinical trials— this is at-risk information on both a patient level and a commercial level.
  • Confidential Information and Intellectual Property: regarding the manufacture of biologic drugs, etc.
  • Commercially Sensitive Information: drug pricing and promotion

Cyber Threats in Life Sciences

Information-related risks including fraud, cyber, and security risks are now the areas of greatest concern for pharma and biotech sectors, as well as the sophisticated nature of medical devices and their connectivity schemas. Commercially sensitive information in all of these areas is at an all-time high. Physical theft or loss of intellectual property (IP) is currently the most prevalent type of security incident in the life sciences sector. Incidents relating to theft and loss of IP are costly and wide-ranging, affecting employees, customers, the organization’s reputation and bottom line, and putting these important research and development projects at risk.

Interconnectivity of corporate data networks is necessary for life sciences; however, this has made intellectual property that much more vulnerable to cyber thieves who can monetize this valuable data. Categories of IP within the life sciences and medical device sectors include pharmaceutical and biotechnology patents, copyrighted data sets and reports, and trade secrets.
Life science organizations should also guard against the loss of personal information such as financial information, personal health information, and medical data.

6 steps for protecting your sensitive proprietary data and IP assets:

1. Identify and data map IP assets within digital and physical systems. This should be done both onsite and in the cloud and include those with access, such as remote vendors and clinical researchers.

2. Protect IP assets by implementing contractual, physical, and digital security systems.

3. Stay informed on the most recent cybersecurity risks. Implement basic security rules and create a security policy program that works to protect your IP assets.

4. Conduct risk assessments regularly to evaluate and simulate best practices around protecting the company and stakeholders in the event of a system and/or data breach.

5. Gain an understanding of the added risks that the Internet of Things and remote medical devices bring. Expect an exponential increase in cybersecurity risks and be prepared to mitigate.

6. Become educated on the legal framework surrounding protection of the confidentiality of IP assets. Additionally, understand the liability and regulatory frameworks impacting cybersecurity in life sciences and medical devices sectors.

Why now?

Cybersecurity should be one of the main focuses in almost any organization’s agenda, but especially for those in the life sciences sector. The massive growth rate and use of Big Data and the Internet of Things are just some of the examples of the need to be hyper-focused on privacy and data security. Systems have never been more complex and interconnected, as powerful and sophisticated discoveries continue in pharma, biotech, and medical devices. Life Science companies should use all tools available, including those offered by their insurers, in order to predict and prevent risk— not just once a year at the Cyber Insurance renewal, but throughout the year.

The Franchisee Factor

Cyber liability poses some unique questions for franchise organizations. Often after a data breach, any well-known retail brand name might lick their wounds, learn a lesson or two, release the specifics around the compromised data, and move on.

An interesting wrinkle arises when you factor the nature of the relationship between the franchisees and the central corporate entity. The franchisees, in most cases, are independent business owners who pay for the privilege of using the Corporate brand and supporting services. When a breach occurs, the affected owners could take a substantial hit to their wallets in the form of lost income, lost wages, spoiled food and other costs, and might look to the corporate “mothership” to make them whole again.

These sort of liability questions might lead the franchisees to take legal action that could significantly impact the potential financial payouts. This situation highlights the fact that franchise organizations have a unique set of challenges when it comes to cyber threats.

The Downside of Franchisor/Franchisee Interdependence

Franchisors and franchisees have an interesting interdependent relationship because while they are different companies, they share entangled domains of trust and risk. Each relies on the other to do its part to protect information and information systems, but many times the incentives aren’t aligned to position both for success. Some of the factors contributing to this poor alignment include
the following:
• The franchisee is often a small individual business that doesn’t have the resources to adequately defend itself when threats arise.
• The franchisor typically avoids getting involved in the specifics of how a franchisee operates because the franchisee is an independent and separate organization and the franchisor isn’t structured for this level of micro-management. After all, the entire model behind a franchise- based enterprise is to allow the business to grow organically by taking advantage of the capital and sweat equity of each franchisee.
• The franchisee operates a local network that depends on services provided by the franchisor. Sometimes the networks share technical access to each other, which can be exploited by attackers to move laterally across networks.
• In many situations, franchisees will share a third-party resource for IT management. Even though franchises are operated independently, shared administration creates a logical broad domain of trust that can be leveraged to launch attacks which hit all independent franchises simultaneously.

Naturally, attackers are aware of all this and it’s not uncommon for them to target individual franchise locations in order to pivot to others or gain access to the broader franchisor network. Alternatively, they may target third-party service providers in order to hit large numbers of franchises at scale. When this happens, complicated questions of liability arise.
• What obligations do individual stores have to protect themselves and each other from cyber threats?
• What role does the franchisor play?
• What’s the appropriate level of security when defending against sophisticated attackers and
what penalties should be assessed when those defenses aren’t up to the task?
• When defenses fail, who is responsible for reporting the breach to consumers?

Regulators are Taking a New Approach

Regulators are shifting the way they view the franchisor/franchisee organizational relationship, even though these are independent operations. When the consumer walks in the front door and swipes his credit card, he’s placing his trust in the logo on the outside of the building, not in the unseen entity whose name is on the local lease.

In 2015, Wyndham Hotels and Resorts settled a lawsuit launched by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission after a data breach at a single franchise hotel in Phoenix raised questions concerning Wyndham’s responsibility to protect consumer data across its 8,000 independent hotels around the globe. As part of its settlement, Wyndham agreed to launch a comprehensive information security program for franchisees, including conducting annual audits.

In 2018, an attack on Canada’s Tim Hortons added a new twist. Most often, when security breaches associated with a retail brand hit the news, it’s because of the impact on consumers. However, the Tim Hortons incident involves direct B2B liability with quantifiable financial damages. This case could set an important precedent and should put all franchisors on notice that keeping their franchisees at an arm’s length can lead them to ignore key risks they should be addressing — for instance, the fact that the franchise business model exposes a complex and extensive attack surface. It’s time for franchisors and franchisees to sit down together and ensure that all franchise defenses are up to the challenge of today’s most sophisticated, targeted threats. It’s also time the insurance industry step up with new products that address these new complicated risks for all parties.

“Hard” Market Conditions in Ocean Cargo Find a Solution in InsurTech

Over the past year, there has been an increasing number of Lloyd’s syndicates who have withdrawn or been closed from the London marine cargo market. The decline of these cargo syndicates reduces the overall supporting capacity from market leaders but also leaves over $6.4 billion dollars of market share up for grabs.

The reasons for this, according to Lloyds, include cargo reportedly running at a 135% loss ratio. This has put a large number of Lloyd’s syndicates either under review or closed completely and brokers are being forced to find other alternative options for their clients. There was also consolidation in 2018 with a number of larger insurance companies purchasing more vulnerable companies. This has resulted in a reduction in the number of market leaders available which restricts different options for insureds.

Lloyd’s has instructed its managing agents to provide a quarterly reports plan to improve the underwriting performance of the seven under-performing classes— Life Sciences/Pharmaceuticals being one of them. The bottoming out of cyclical market conditions, frequently caused by over-capacity, often results in violent price and coverage adjustments that punish not only those insureds with poor operations but the good as well.

The use of technology and data can help insurance buyers to differentiate their risk profiles. Corvus specializes in providing broad Ocean Cargo and Stock Throughput coverage for spoilage and other perils for Temperature sensitive products within the Food and Life Science industries. We are using data from leading IoT sensor providers to provide something NEW that is helping Brokers on our platform differentiate themselves and win new business with Life Science and traditional food customers.

Corvus compares the temperature shipment data of an insured to our mammoth database of shipment data. Our algorithms produce a Corvus Score through which we communicate our underwriting outcomes and coverage grants. We also use our CrowBar data platform to bring new information to our clients throughout the policy year in order to help our insureds identify anomalies that might lead to a claim. Working together, we manage risk and reduce claims. The win-win solution of Corvus, for those insureds that want to engage with the use of their data, is a better outcome from a “hard” insurance market that acceptance of price increases.

scientists

The Big (Uninsured) Risk for Early Stage Life Science Companies

Early stage Life Science companies are invariably betting a great amount of capital on the human clinical trial testing of their first products. Immense work and expense go into lining up clinical trial sites, scaling up early manufacturing (or contract manufacturing) and building the team of Clinical, QA/QC, Medical, Legal, and related resources.  All of that overhead is devoted to just one thing— advancing the clinical material into clinical trials. However, something as simple as spoilage of a shipment can lead to an immense uninsured loss.

Time to market may be a huge factor of course, but risks associated with idle unproductive employees and the associated salaries, benefits, rent, and other overhead that often add to losses while the batch from the shipment is being recreated are usually uninsured with standard Ocean Cargo policies.

This proverbial tightening of the funnel should be a great target for important insurance coverage but has been left uninsurable by incumbent insurers in the market. Amy Sinclair, Life Sciences Practice Leader in the Boston office of Arthur J. Gallagher said, “A loss of clinical trial material in transit can lead to a Business Interruption and Extra Expense Insurance loss. We can cover that under a Property Insurance policy while the goods are in a fixed location like our client’s manufacturing building.  But until now, we have been unable to get insurance for our clients that responds to the risk exposure caused by a loss of goods while in transit or at warehouse or clinical trial locations.”

Corvus Insurance, with a deep understanding of Life Sciences logistics, has developed a proprietary Extra Expense form in an attempt to make whole those Life Science companies that suffer an insured loss (from spoilage or any other insured peril – theft, fire, windstorm, etc.).  

“This new coverage from Corvus fills a gap that responds to a critical, but previously ignored, risk exposure for Life Science companies,” said Steve Sawyer of Woodruff Sawyer in San Francisco. The policy form is available on request from Corvus.

Corvus Insurance Holdings underwrites Smart Cargo™ Insurance for the Life Sciences and Food industries on behalf of Argo Insurance Group (Best’s Rated, A, XIII).  Brokers on our platform are bringing needed, innovative and differentiated product into the market and great value to their clients.

 

Technology

InsurTech: Easier Than a Flu Shot

InsurTech is a new concept that is revitalizing an old industry. But what exactly is it, and how does it work? And how is Corvus shaking up something that’s already so cutting edge? InsurTech can be broken down into three primary aspects, each one important, all working together to run a system with maximum efficiency. Imagine visiting a doctor’s office— you check in at the front desk, you get your physical, and you get your bill. For most people, the bill is the greatest concern— and that’s why this third aspect is where Corvus is focusing its energy. What if you could prove to the doctor that you have been taking great care of your body all year? That you’ve been exercising, eating right, and cutting down on beers? And what if the doctor, having received this information, would, in turn, charge you less because of your healthy habits? That’s what Corvus is trying to do for commercial insurance buyers.

But we’re getting a little ahead of ourselves. So let’s begin at the “front desk” of insurance, the first aspect— that is, the contracts, the insurance platforms themselves, etc. This is the gateway to your policy, and there’s a lot of cool stuff happening in this arena. For instance, there is some great technology being applied to things like the mobile-enablement of auto claims, blockchain for reinsurance contract fulfillment, and online sales platforms for brokers and agents. This can cut the costs of managing an auto claim from 3% of premium to 2% which, given the size of the auto market, is an incredible achievement.

Next, we go to the actual doctor’s appointment— the second aspect, the product that you’re purchasing. Online channels, direct or broker-focused (Insureon or Wellthie are examples), as well as products that are sold for less than a year for the gig economy or on a P2P basis, fit into this category. Distribution costs can run from 3 to 30% or more, so reducing distribution costs is a big deal if they respond better to customer needs than conventional products and distribution methods.

The third aspect, where Corvus is most concerned, is that final doctor’s bill in the form of claims paid. This is where Corvus is particularly innovative— by using your data, we are able to help you reduce your risk in order to reduce your claims. Companies like Neos in the UK do this by giving out theft or water detection devices in order to prevent or respond more quickly to events that frequently lead to homeowners claims. Corvus accomplishes this not by creating new monitors of data, but by leveraging and licensing existing data sources to price, predict, and prevent commercial insurance claims. We use temperature sensors for cargo subject to spoilage in order to monitor and score risk with full customer (and broker) transparency. We are also perfecting the same for cyber (web-scanning technology). One big difference in this arena is the richness of the targets. In commercial insurance, between 60 and 80% of premiums go to pay claims. Reducing the cost of claims by 15% will make a bigger impact on overall economics than cutting distribution or back-end costs in half.

Corvus is excited to be breaking into InsurTech and excited for you to join us on this journey. From cargo to cars, we’ll reward you for your hard work, and you’ll reap the benefits of safer habits. By creating InsurTech for you, we are going to make the world a better place.

 

Technology

Data Dive: More Information Creates More Opportunity For Brokers

Anyone who has spent any time at an insurance company has heard the saying “there are no bad customers, just bad pricing.” Seemingly innocuous on the surface, it is symptomatic of the fact that the customer and the insurance company aren’t in a mutual partnership. Often, it’s true. Traditional insurance companies rarely think about individual customers and businesses, instead choosing to focus on collecting data that transforms the company into a statistic. Corvus turns this approach on its head. We use data that measure the underlying causes of losses, and we make our clients an active participant by mining and sharing this data to help take corrective action.

 

The traditional insurance pricing model focuses on aligning the cost of insurance with expected future losses, using data collected from a wide variety of sources to do so. In a market with many competitors, there is constant pressure for companies to charge more for risky customers, or else have their low risk customers leave for a lower priced insurer. In the extreme, aligning price with a customer’s risk breaks down the social goal of insurance in the first place: to pool society’s risk and help each other overcome fortuitous events. We see this in many cases through government backed insurance programs where private insurance companies are unwilling to participate for the riskiest customers.

 

The issue with this approach is that while insurers collect a lot of data from many sources, they’ve historically been limited in the depth of that data. As a result, most business insurers attempt to correlate abstract variables about a business with insurance claims. In the case of cargo insurance, they may use information about the age of the truck, the type and annual amount of goods being shipped, and even business credit score. While these components correlate with future expected claims, from the perspective of improving the client’s business and reducing risk, they are meaningless. Traditional insurance companies rarely share this data with customers in any meaningful way, and even if they did you’d be hard pressed to find a use. No company in their right mind is going to ship fewer goods to save money on their insurance.

 

Corvus is taking a new approach to insurance, capitalizing on the proliferation of data at more granular levels and without legacy systems and practices holding us back. We seek out insurance products that have a large amount of untapped data, but most importantly, untapped data which measures the underlying causes of the insurance risk— as opposed to generic information about the client’s business. With our Smart Cargo Insurance product, we use the temperature data from an individual’s shipments to identify when their cargo is most susceptible to spoilage. With our Smart Cyber Insurance, we can identify a customer’s IT security vulnerabilities that enable outside parties to breach their data. By moving our data closer to the true source of risk, we’ve created pricing and underwriting unique to each business’ risks, which makes for increased transparency and fairness for all customers.

 

Having all this data is great, but if we only use it to charge our customers different prices, we’d be no different than every other company. Instead, we take transparency a step further by sharing this novel data in our Dynamic Loss Prevention report, providing insight on the factors in a client’s control that are most likely to prevent claims. Where traditional insurance companies penalize risky companies by charging them more money, Corvus aims for a mutually beneficial approach that reduces losses, putting both parties in a better situation. We are living in a data-driven world, and it’s time for the insurance industry to step up to the bat and play. At Corvus, we are using this data to center clients’ needs and to mitigate their risk— and we’re doing it transparently, so customers can make the choices that are best for them.

Handshake

Venture Capitalists, InsurTech and Choosing Your Customer

As Corvus contemplates its next stage of fundraising, after respecting the August VC break, we are having some interesting conversations, not just about Corvus but about how VCs see the world.  Some thoughts about VCs, distribution channels, and number of products seemed worthy of sharing to other entrepreneurs in the space.

 

First, an attempt at categorization of InsurTech.  Everybody has one, here is mine. Many, perhaps most InsurTechs are focused on efficiency and reliability of back-room systems for insurer processes, examples range from blockchain for reinsurance transactions to new data that improves underwriting.  Customer – insurer.

 

A second category focuses on digital distribution of insurance.  From term life to renter’s insurance to SME business covers, these InsurTechs rely on SEM and awesome digital experience combined with behavioral economics and other tech insights in order to connect with online shoppers.  Customer – small premium consumer.

 

Still others are working alongside Corvus to build tech-enabled commercial insurance products sold through brokers.  Whether new data comes from social media, mobile phones, IoT sensors, and the like makes little difference to these InsurTechs.  They key is getting to commercial sized organizations that benefit from the new data. And the only road to the mid-sized commercial insurance market is through brokers.  See Zenefits and their $500MM of capital if you still think otherwise. Customer – insurance brokers.

 

A few InsurTechs are attempting to combine several of these tech advantages.  In the presence of these more ambitious challengers is where Corvus flies. We are trying to master more than one of these InsurTech capabilities.  In fact, we think that mastery of new data sources in order to create tech-enabled commercial insurance products requires a very thoughtful approach to building digital platforms.  Combining our tech-enabled products with a digital experience designed to make our brokers look like heroes and builds barriers to entry for our competitors that will invariably come into the market.  Platforms like our CrowBar will support multiple products, building a brand that can leverage sales, marketing, SEM, and a digital platform. Corvus knows it customers – Commercial Insurance brokers.

 

Some VCs think that the key choice is around the product. They advise companies to stick with one product or one digital capability in order to try to master it before moving on years later.  That may be because one product companies have easier exit strategies – build to sell. Thankfully, some VCs are more ambitious and see that the choice of customer is a more critical defining factor for InsurTech success.  Having chosen a customer to serve, tech needs to be built for all aspects of the experience.

 

As a closing comment, those InsurTechs that aspire to build tech for brokers but also to work around brokers disrespect the channel at their peril.  We won’t forget – commercial insurance brokers. IMHO.  InsurTech. For You.